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Children’s Motrin and Tylenol Recalled, Real Problem May Not Be Contaminated Wood Pallets

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Two popular over-the-counter medicines for children – Motrin and Tylenol – were recalled due to numerous reports of an odd odor emanating from the drug’s container. The children’s Motrin and Tylenol are not the only drugs recalled. In fact, they’re part of a larger recall of over 60 million bottles.

The Tylenol and Motrin specifically recalled include:

· Children’s Tylenol Bubblegum Meltaway

· Children’s Tylenol Grape Meltaway

· Junior Strength Motrin IB Grape Chewable

· Junior Strength Motrin IB Caplet

· Junior Strength Motrin IB Orange Chewable

Drug company McNeill/Johnson & Johnson alleges the odor is caused by a chemical known as 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA), which is used to treat the wooden pallets that store and move medicine bottles, according to babycenter.com. All shipments that use this chemical have been stopped and all suppliers are now required to stop using the pallets or provide certification that they do not contain TBA.

Here’s a video discussing the Children’s Motrin and Tylenol recall…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dwMOVE3xzY&feature=related

However, the suppliers contend that the wood packaging may not be the culprit of the odd odor. The wooden pallet industry, who recently released a letter to the drug manufacturer, insist McNeil show "definitive evidence that the source of the contamination was TBA. We also insist that you provide technical and scientific theory as to how this chemical could spread from a tertiary packaging component to a primary packaging component through various layers of cardboard and plastic packaging surrounding the primary product," said Bruce Scholnick, president of the National Wooden Pallet & Container Assocation, according to CNN.

We may just be scratching the surface of this issue. The FDA criticized McNeill/Johnson & Johnson for taking so long to issue the recall. Was their procrastination just a lack of realizing how serious this issue was or were they trying to formulate a strategy to shift the blame away from their product and to the shipping containers? No one can know for sure. Unfortunately, as these companies bicker over who is deemed responsible, innocent people are suffering side effects like nausea, stomach pains and diarrhea due to these dangerous drugs.

About the Editors: Shapiro, Cooper, Lewis & Appleton personal injury law firm (NC-VA law offices ) edits the injury law blogs Northeast North Carolina Injuryboard, Virginia Beach Injuryboard, and Norfolk Injuryboard as a pro bono service to consumers.